Safety is our Standard : October 20-21, 2021

Canadian Agriculture Safety Association Virtual Conference

Program times listed in CDT.

9:45am – 10:00amWelcome

Emcee: Wendy Bennett, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

10:00am – 12:00pmChanging Behavior Focus

Dr. Ryan Klataske,

Kansas State University

10:00am – 11:00am

Humans, Culture, and Agricultural Safety

How can we better understand and address the cultural dimensions of agricultural safety? By highlighting perspectives and tools from cultural anthropology, this presentation explores this question and outlines steps for incorporating the voices, experiences, and needs of culturally diverse agricultural workers, producers, and other stakeholders. It considers how we might use the concept of “safety culture” to bring about change and draws on insights from on-going research with cattle feedyard workers, ranchers, farm parents, and safety professionals.

Cynthia Beck,

University of Regina

11:00am – 12:00pm

The Potential of Motivators for Behaviour Change in Agriculture Production

Cynthia Beck, MA Clinical Psychology Candidate and agriculture producer, will be discussing the potential barriers to behaviour change experienced by agriculture producers, as well as the possible facilitators for motivating behaviour change.

12:00pm – 1:00pmBreak

1:00pm – 3:00pmChanging Behavior Focus

Emcee: Dan Trottier, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

Dr. Dayna Lee-Baggley,

Howatt HR Consulting

1:00pm – 2:00pm

Collaboration and Influence: Being an Authentic Leader

As leaders, how we show up at work everyday matters. This course will explore what it means to be an authentic leader and how being an authentic leader and building trust can create positive influence in your organization, particularly in times of stress like what we have experienced during COVID-19. In this course you will learn about how trusting cultures facilitate positive employee experiences and promote two-way accountability for creating a psychologically healthy and safe workplace that takes care of employees and leadership. By the end of the session leaders will: 1) explore the characteristics of an authentic leader; 2) understand how to foster a trusting culture and the six possible pitfalls that can impact trust building with your staff, 3) learn how trust, honesty and integrity build collaboration and influence and how to maintain honesty and integrity in your daily work life; 4) share the importance of influencing skills; 5) examine how incivility can negatively impact the organization; 5) review key take-aways which will help you apply micro-skills to build trust through daily and intentional micro-decisions.

Robin Cropped

Robin Anderson,

Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

2:00pm – 3:00pm

Changing Behavior Focus Discussion

Moderator: Robin Anderson, Canadian Agriculture Safety Association
Panelists: Ryan Klataske, Cynthia Beck, Dr. Dayna Lee Baggley

3:00pm – 3:15pmWrap Up Day 1

9:45am – 10:00amWelcome

Emcee: Michele Rogalsky, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

10:00am – 12:00pmEmergency Preparedness

Graham Knox,

BC Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries

10:00am – 11:00am

Emergency Preparedness – Rural Emergency Planning with a Focus on the Impact on Farms

This presentation will focus on emergency events impacting the rural ag sector (livestock disease events, floods, wildfires, etc.), role and responsibilities, planning and preparedness considerations and tools, impacts and observations from recent events.

Nicole Segstro,

STARS

11:00am – 11:30am

When Seconds Matter – A look at STARS Rural Emergency Response

STARS Air Ambulance – Rural Roots

  • How STARS Vigilant Supports the Ag industry
  • Site Registration – Planning for the unexpected
  • STARS rural response- how one call results in the coordination of the most appropriate response
  • Our partners
  • Share a VIP story

Casper “Cap” Bendixsen,

National Farm Medicine Center

11:30am – 11:45am

Flexing Trust Firefighters and Farmers Tackling Farm Safety Together

Some farm. Some show up when you call 911. Some do both. But no matter who you are in rural life, you play a role in making it safer. The Rural Firefighters Delivering Agriculture Safety and Health (RF-DASH) program is bringing together farmers and emergency responders for a big job: reducing agricultural incidents throughout our rural communities’-DASH is designed to give the community peace of mind by building trust and improving farmers’ access to capable health and safety consultation. Through RF-DASH, rural firefighters and emergency responders are provided with farm safety knowledge and tools to reduce farm hazards and improve farm safety.

Robert Gobeil,

OHS Cert., NCSO

11:45am – 11:55am

Coming Soon: CASA PEP Program

Rob will speak to us about CASA use of the UMASH RF-DASH program and starting a pilot project for a Canadian audience. He will also share with us the importance of emergency planning as a means of mitigating loss in farming operations.

12:00pm – 1:00pmBreak

1:00pm – 3:00pmCulture Change

Emcee: Karl Klotzbach, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

Andrea Lear,

Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

1:00pm – 1:15pm

Summary of the FCC Canadian Ag Safety Study (March 2020)

Colleen Goertz,

TC Energy

Adam Schnell,

TC Energy

Karlee Jenkins,

TC Energy

1:15pm – 2:05pm

Safety Culture with TC Energy

At TC Energy, safety is a core value, not a priority. We believe this is an important distinction because, while priorities may shift and change from day to day, values run much deeper. Values are a part of our character, and they remain constant whether we are a work, at home or at play. We’ve invested in creating a culture of safety through training and engaging communication strategies to help every person at TC Energy understand safety as a value and apply to their daily lives. We live by the following tenets, five simple statements that tell the world what safety means at TC Energy:

  • Believe zero is real: All harm, loss and incidents are preventable.
  • Do it right: Today’s quality is tomorrow’s safety.
  • Take action: Stop unsafe work, actions and behaviours at work and at home 24/7.
  • Learn from each other: Share and apply what we learn.
  • Care and protect: Nothing is more important than the well-being of our people, the communities in which we operate and the environment.

These statements are the foundation of all our safety, quality and health programs. They guide our work, how we operate in the community, and how we steward the environment.

Dr. William Pickett,

Brock University

2:05pm – 3:00pm

Injuries on Canadian farms: Thinking Together about Risks and Farm Culture

It is well known that Canadian farmers and their families experience high rates of traumatic injury. Some of this is attributable to the many risks to safety that are inherent to farming and the farming lifestyle. However, culture also plays an important role in these situations.

In this presentation, Dr Pickett will describe a series of novel Canadian analyses that examine experiences with risk reported in Canadian farm populations. Starting with the very young, we will learn from parents of small children about how they weigh the risks of bringing their toddlers into the worksite versus their perceptions of the benefits of such practices. We will then move on to the adolescent population and examine the choices that young people make in terms of engagement in risk behaviours, and why these are higher than their urban counterparts. The discussion will then extend to farm operators to try to understand why risk is embraced as a normal part of work life. And we will end with a presentation of additional analyses about the choices that older farmers are making, and then how risks appear to be transferred between generations on farms.

All of these analyses support the idea that risk is inherent to the occupation that is farming, and that these risks cross generations and have deep cultural roots. Engagement in risk-taking can have enormous benefits and also obvious harms. The question is … how can this information lead to new thinking about farm health and safety that is culturally sensitive, yet effective in preventing the worst of the ongoing injury problem.

Our objectives will be as follow:

  1. To gain further understanding of relevant social theory, and why risk may be inherent to farm populations and culture
  2. To review data from 4-5 Canadian studies that sheds new light on how and why such risks are engaged with
  3. To understand the implications of this risk-taking in terms of traumatic injury
  4. To think together as to how this information might impact the content and delivery of agricultural health and safety policies and programs.

3:00pm – 3:05pmWrap Up Day 2

Wednesday, October 20, 2021

9:45am – 10:00amWelcome

Emcee: Wendy Bennett, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

10:00am – 12:00pmChanging Behavior Focus

Dr. Ryan Klataske,

Kansas State University

10:00am – 11:00am

Humans, Culture, and Agricultural Safety

How can we better understand and address the cultural dimensions of agricultural safety? By highlighting perspectives and tools from cultural anthropology, this presentation explores this question and outlines steps for incorporating the voices, experiences, and needs of culturally diverse agricultural workers, producers, and other stakeholders. It considers how we might use the concept of “safety culture” to bring about change and draws on insights from on-going research with cattle feedyard workers, ranchers, farm parents, and safety professionals.

Cynthia Beck,

University of Regina

11:00am – 12:00pm

The Potential of Motivators for Behaviour Change in Agriculture Production

Cynthia Beck, MA Clinical Psychology Candidate and agriculture producer, will be discussing the potential barriers to behaviour change experienced by agriculture producers, as well as the possible facilitators for motivating behaviour change.

12:00pm – 1:00pmBreak

1:00pm – 3:00pmChanging Behavior Focus

Emcee: Dan Trottier, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

Dr. Dayna Lee-Baggley,

Howatt HR Consulting

1:00pm – 2:00pm

Collaboration and Influence: Being an Authentic Leader

As leaders, how we show up at work everyday matters. This course will explore what it means to be an authentic leader and how being an authentic leader and building trust can create positive influence in your organization, particularly in times of stress like what we have experienced during COVID-19. In this course you will learn about how trusting cultures facilitate positive employee experiences and promote two-way accountability for creating a psychologically healthy and safe workplace that takes care of employees and leadership. By the end of the session leaders will: 1) explore the characteristics of an authentic leader; 2) understand how to foster a trusting culture and the six possible pitfalls that can impact trust building with your staff, 3) learn how trust, honesty and integrity build collaboration and influence and how to maintain honesty and integrity in your daily work life; 4) share the importance of influencing skills; 5) examine how incivility can negatively impact the organization; 5) review key take-aways which will help you apply micro-skills to build trust through daily and intentional micro-decisions.

Robin Cropped

Robin Anderson,

Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

2:00pm – 3:00pm

Changing Behavior Focus Discussion

Moderator: Robin Anderson, Canadian Agriculture Safety Association
Panelists: Ryan Klataske, Cynthia Beck, Dr. Dayna Lee Baggley

3:00pm – 3:15pmWrap Up Day 1

Thursday, October 21, 2021

9:45am – 10:00amWelcome

Emcee: Michele Rogalsky, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

10:00am – 12:00pmEmergency Preparedness

Graham Knox,

BC Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Fisheries

10:00am – 11:00am

Emergency Preparedness – Rural Emergency Planning with a Focus on the Impact on Farms

This presentation will focus on emergency events impacting the rural ag sector (livestock disease events, floods, wildfires, etc.), role and responsibilities, planning and preparedness considerations and tools, impacts and observations from recent events.

Nicole Segstro,

STARS

11:00am – 11:30am

When Seconds Matter – A look at STARS Rural Emergency Response

STARS Air Ambulance – Rural Roots

  • How STARS Vigilant Supports the Ag industry
  • Site Registration – Planning for the unexpected
  • STARS rural response- how one call results in the coordination of the most appropriate response
  • Our partners
  • Share a VIP story

Casper “Cap” Bendixsen,

National Farm Medicine Center

11:30am – 11:45am

Flexing Trust Firefighters and Farmers Tackling Farm Safety Together

Some farm. Some show up when you call 911. Some do both. But no matter who you are in rural life, you play a role in making it safer. The Rural Firefighters Delivering Agriculture Safety and Health (RF-DASH) program is bringing together farmers and emergency responders for a big job: reducing agricultural incidents throughout our rural communities’-DASH is designed to give the community peace of mind by building trust and improving farmers’ access to capable health and safety consultation. Through RF-DASH, rural firefighters and emergency responders are provided with farm safety knowledge and tools to reduce farm hazards and improve farm safety.

Robert Gobeil,

OHS Cert., NCSO

11:45am – 11:55am

Coming Soon: CASA PEP Program

Rob will speak to us about CASA use of the UMASH RF-DASH program and starting a pilot project for a Canadian audience. He will also share with us the importance of emergency planning as a means of mitigating loss in farming operations.

12:00pm – 1:00pmBreak

1:00pm – 3:00pmCulture Change

Emcee: Karl Klotzbach, Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

Andrea Lear,

Canadian Agricultural Safety Association

1:00pm – 1:15pm

Summary of the FCC Canadian Ag Safety Study (March 2020)

Colleen Goertz,

TC Energy

Adam Schnell,

TC Energy

Karlee Jenkins,

TC Energy

1:15pm – 2:05pm

Safety Culture with TC Energy

At TC Energy, safety is a core value, not a priority. We believe this is an important distinction because, while priorities may shift and change from day to day, values run much deeper. Values are a part of our character, and they remain constant whether we are a work, at home or at play. We’ve invested in creating a culture of safety through training and engaging communication strategies to help every person at TC Energy understand safety as a value and apply to their daily lives. We live by the following tenets, five simple statements that tell the world what safety means at TC Energy:

  • Believe zero is real: All harm, loss and incidents are preventable.
  • Do it right: Today’s quality is tomorrow’s safety.
  • Take action: Stop unsafe work, actions and behaviours at work and at home 24/7.
  • Learn from each other: Share and apply what we learn.
  • Care and protect: Nothing is more important than the well-being of our people, the communities in which we operate and the environment.

These statements are the foundation of all our safety, quality and health programs. They guide our work, how we operate in the community, and how we steward the environment.

Dr. William Pickett,

Brock University

2:05pm – 3:00pm

Injuries on Canadian farms: Thinking Together about Risks and Farm Culture

It is well known that Canadian farmers and their families experience high rates of traumatic injury. Some of this is attributable to the many risks to safety that are inherent to farming and the farming lifestyle. However, culture also plays an important role in these situations.

In this presentation, Dr Pickett will describe a series of novel Canadian analyses that examine experiences with risk reported in Canadian farm populations. Starting with the very young, we will learn from parents of small children about how they weigh the risks of bringing their toddlers into the worksite versus their perceptions of the benefits of such practices. We will then move on to the adolescent population and examine the choices that young people make in terms of engagement in risk behaviours, and why these are higher than their urban counterparts. The discussion will then extend to farm operators to try to understand why risk is embraced as a normal part of work life. And we will end with a presentation of additional analyses about the choices that older farmers are making, and then how risks appear to be transferred between generations on farms.

All of these analyses support the idea that risk is inherent to the occupation that is farming, and that these risks cross generations and have deep cultural roots. Engagement in risk-taking can have enormous benefits and also obvious harms. The question is … how can this information lead to new thinking about farm health and safety that is culturally sensitive, yet effective in preventing the worst of the ongoing injury problem.

Our objectives will be as follow:

  1. To gain further understanding of relevant social theory, and why risk may be inherent to farm populations and culture
  2. To review data from 4-5 Canadian studies that sheds new light on how and why such risks are engaged with
  3. To understand the implications of this risk-taking in terms of traumatic injury
  4. To think together as to how this information might impact the content and delivery of agricultural health and safety policies and programs.

3:00pm – 3:05pmWrap Up Day 2